On-demand work: choosing inclusivity over exclusivity

The increase of on-demand work has created the necessity for websites tailored to connect freelancers with employment. Information Systems professor Kevin Hong’s research shows that the current model for advertising potential jobs can be better designed to increase employment.

The increase in on-demand work has created the necessity for websites tailored to connect freelancers with employment. Information Systems professor Kevin Hong’s research shows that the current model for advertising potential jobs can be better designed to increase employment.

From LSE US Centre, June 25, 2016:

The “gig” economy is here. Companies like Freelancer.com and Upwork connect millions of freelancers with employers for on-demand work. According to a national survey conducted by research firm Edelman Berland in partnership with Upwork, 34 million people in the U.S. — approximately one in three workers — now work as freelancers. Those freelancers work as software developers, graphical designers, copy editors and even accountants.

Open versus sealed bid auctions, which works better for employers? It is a classic question in many disciplines, such as economics, that we seek to answer. In a recent paper, my coauthors and I examine this question using data from one of the largest online labor markets.

Kevin Hong studies the areas of online markets and user-generated content. Specifically, focusing on theorizing and empirically testing the nature and effects of consumer uncertainty in online e-commerce markets and online labor markets.

About Kevin Hong.