Faculty

Michael Hanemann

W. Michael Hanemann

Center Director
Julie A. Wrigley Chair in Economics and Sustainability

Michael Hanemann is the Julie A. Wrigley Chair in Economics and Sustainability within the School of Sustainability and the W. P. Carey School of Business; and Distinguished Sustainability Scientist at the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability. Dr. Hanemann is also a Chancellor’s Professor Emeritus in the Department of Agricultural and Resources Economics and the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, where he was on the faculty since 1976. He earned a B.A. from Oxford University in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, an M.Sc. in Economics from the London School of Economics and a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University.

Michael Hanemann is a leading contributor to the field of environmental and resource economics. He is best known for his work on non-market valuation for environmental and other commodities using both revealed and stated preference, but he has also made important contributions to the economics of water, the economics of irreversibility and environmental management under uncertainty, and more recently the economics of climate change. His research has focused largely on aspects of understanding and modeling individual preferences and individual choice behavior, with applications to demand forecasting, the design of conservation policy, and environmental regulation.

Awards recognizing Dr. Hanemann’s excellence in the field include election as member of the National Academy of Sciences, 2011, Fellow of the American Agricultural Economics Association, 2010, Lifetime Award for Outstanding Achievement from the European Association of Environmental & Resource Economists in 2008, Inaugural Fellow of the Association of Environmental & Resource Economists in 2006, and an honorary doctorate from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in 2003. He is a lead author in Working Group III of the IPCC Fifth Assessment.

Joshua Abbott

Joshua Abbott

Associate Professor
School of Sustainability

Biographical Information  |  Website

Kelly Bishop

Kelly Bishop

Assistant Professor
Department of Economics

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Kelly Bishop is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Arizona State University. She has been at ASU since 2013 and was previously an Assistant Professor of Economics at the Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis from 2008 to 2013. Her research interests include environmental economics, public economics, and labor economics. Kelly earned her Ph.D. in Economics from Duke University, an M.A. in Economics from University College Dublin, and a B.A. in Economics from Barnard College.

Recent Publications:
“Valuing Time-Varying Attributes using the Hedonic Model: When is a Dynamic Approach Necessary?” with Alvin Murphy, Review of Economics and Statistics, forthcoming (2018)
“Using Panel Data to Easily Estimate Hedonic Demand Functions,” with Christopher Timmins, Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, 5, no. 3 (July 2018): 517-543.

Courses:
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (ECN312)

Jeffrey Englin

Jeffrey Englin

Professor
Morrison School of Agribusiness

Biographical Information

Stephie Fried

Stephie Fried

Assistant Professor
Department of Economics

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Alexander Hill

Alexander Hill

Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Economics

Lily Hsueh

Lily Hsueh

Assistant Professor
School of Public Affairs

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Dr. Lily Hsueh is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the ASU School of Public Affairs. Her areas of expertise are natural resource and environmental economics and policy, political economy, governance, applied econometrics. Hsueh’s current research investigates how different forms of alternative governance systems interact and shape the private provision of public goods and the management of natural resources and the environment.

Her previous and ongoing projects examine the emergence, evolution, and impacts of voluntary/private approaches (e.g., industry self-regulation) and market-based policies (e.g., cap and trade) in climate change, ocean and marine resources, and toxic chemicals. Outlets for Hsueh’s work have included the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, Journal of Environmental Management, Environmental Science & Policy, Marine Policy, Regulation & Governance, among others. Funders for her work include the National Research Council, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, and the V. Kann Rasmussen Foundation. Prior to joining ASU, Hsueh held the National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship at the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration.

At ASU, Hsueh teaches economics of public policy to both undergraduate and graduate students. She is a recipient of the 2016-17 Distinguished Teaching Award. Before academia, Hsueh was a Senior Analyst in Economic Research at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. She received a Ph.D. in Public Policy & Management from the University of Washington, MSc in Economics from University College London, and a BA in Economics with a minor in Environmental Economics and Policy from UC Berkeley.

Nicolai V. Kuminoff

Nicolai V. Kuminoff

Associate Professor
Department of Economics

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Nicolai Kuminoff is an Associate Professor in the Economics Department at Arizona State University and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research aims to understand consumer preferences for non-market amenities from their sorting behavior in associated private markets for goods and services such as housing, labor, and health care. Recent projects include developing satellite accounts for non-market expenditures, predicting the distributional welfare effects of choice architecture policies, examining how long-term pollution exposure affects cognitive functioning and decision making, and estimating the value of a statistical life.

Professor Kuminoff’s research has been funded by EPA, NIH, NSF and other agencies, and published in journals such as the American Economic Review, International Economic Review, Journal of Economic Literature, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Journal of Urban Economics, Environmental and Resource Economics, and Review of Environmental Economics and Policy.. He teaches a Ph.D. course on “Advanced Topics in Environmental Economics”. Professor Kuminoff obtained a Ph.D. in Economics from North Carolina State University (2006) and MS (2000) and BS (1999) degrees in Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics from the University of California-Davis.

Adam Lampert

Adam Lampert

Assistant Professor
School of Human Evolution and Social Change

Bryan Leonard

Bryan Leonard

Assistant Professor
School of Sustainability

Website

My research seeks to better understand the conditions under which the creation of formal property rights leads to net efficiency gains by reducing rent dissipation. I focus on several factors that can impair the benefits of assigning formal property rights including:
i) Transaction costs associated with realigning the spatial scale and distribution of property rights for efficient management of resources that operate at multiple scales.
ii) Pre-existing informal institutions that may be disrupted by formal rights.
iii) Incomplete or constrained property rights that are created when alternative policy goals and political factors trade off with economic efficiency.

I study these potential pitfalls and how to avoid them to provide a richer understanding of the evolution and performance of different institutional responses to natural resource and environmental problems, with emphasis on coordination and collective action for managing natural resources.

Published and Accepted Articles:
Leonard, Bryan and Gary D. Libecap. “Collective Action by Contract: Prior Appropriation and the Development of Irrigation in the Western United States.” (Previously circulated as NBER WP 22185). Accepted, Journal of Law and Economics.
Leonard, Bryan and Shawn Regan. “Legal and Institutional Barriers to Establishing Non-Use Rights to Federally Managed Natural Resources.” Accepted, Natural Resources Journal
Leonard, Bryan, Christopher Costello and Gary D. Libecap. “Water Market Design, Transaction Costs, and the Political Economy of Property Rights to Natural Resources.” Accepted, Review of Environmental Economics and Policy
Leonard, Bryan and Gary D. Libecap. “Endogenous First-Possession Property Rights in Open Access Resources.” Iowa Law Review 100 no. 6. (2015).

Courses:
SOS 325: Economics of Sustainability
SOS 591: Collective Action and the Commons

Mark Manfredo

Mark Manfredo

Professor and Director
Morrison School of Agribusiness

Biographical Information

Valerie Mueller

Valerie Mueller

Assistant Professor
School of Politics and Global Studies

School of Politics and Global Studies directory  |  Website

Valerie Mueller is currently an assistant professor in the School of Politics and Global Studies. Prior to joining Arizona State University, she was a senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington, D.C. Mueller’s research falls largely into three main themes. The first quantifies rural household vulnerability to climate variability, focusing on migration, nutrition, and health markers in Africa and Asia.

The second area of research uses randomized controlled trials to identify mechanisms to improve the delivery of rural services (legal justice for women, agricultural extension, and the equitable allocation of irrigation water) in East African countries. Her third area of research is on the prospects of youth employment in Africa. She is currently co-editing a volume, which studies the evolution of youth employment and its role in the structural transformation process in Africa.

Her research contributions have been featured in Nature Climate Change, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, American Economic Review, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, and the Journal of Development Economics, and have received significant media coverage in over 15 major media outlets (including Le Monde, Science, and Scientific American). Despite her presence in the research community, she remains involved in the field and aims to provide relevant technical expertise by repeated interaction with donor communities, local policymakers, and government officials.

Alvin Murphy

Alvin Murphy

Associate Professor
Department of Economics

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Alvin Murphy is an Associate Professor in the Economics Department at Arizona State University. His research aims to understand supply and demand dynamics for public goods and urban amenities. Recent projects include developing a dynamic model of residential location choice, estimating how speculative behavior by landowners limits housing supply, and examining how potential restrictions on housing subsidies affect household demands for localized amenities.

Murphy’s research has been published in the American Economic Review, Econometrica, International Economic Review, Review of Economics and Statistics, American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, and the Journal of Econometrics. Murphy obtained a Ph.D. in Economics (2008) from Duke University, an M.A. in Economics (2002) from University College Dublin (Ireland), and a B.A. in Economics and Political Science (2000) from Trinity College Dublin (Ireland).

Charles Perrings

Charles Perrings

Professor 
School of Life Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Co-Director
School of Life Sciences Ecoservices Group

Biographical Information  |  Website  |  EcoSERVICES Group

Tim Richards

Tim Richards

Marvin and June Morrison Chair in Agribusiness
W.P. Carey Morrison School of Agribusiness

Deborah Salon

Deborah Salon

Assistant Professor
School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning

Troy Schmitz

Troy Schmitz

Associate Professor
Morrison School of Agribusiness

Biographical Information

Glenn Sheriff

Glenn Sheriff

Assistant Professor
School of Politics and Global Studies

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Glenn Sheriff is an assistant professor in the School of Politics and Global Studies, with a research focus on the distribution of benefits and costs of environmental, natural resource, and climate policy. He received his master’s and doctorate in agricultural and resource economics at the University of Maryland. Before joining the Arizona State University faculty, he taught at Columbia University and served as an economist at several federal agencies including the U.S. State Department, White House Council on Environmental Quality, Environmental Protection Agency, and Department of Agriculture.

Recent Publications:
Glenn Sheriff, Ann E. Ferris, and Ronald J. Shadbegian, “How Did Air Quality Standards Affect Employment at US Power Plants? The Importance of Timing, Geography, and Stringency,” Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists 6, no. 1 (January 2019): 111-149.

Glenn Sheriff, “Burden Sharing Under the Paris Climate Agreement” Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (Forthcoming).

Courses:
Globalization and the Environment

kerry-smith

V. Kerry Smith

Emeritus Regents’ Professor
Emeritus Professor of Economics
Department of Economics

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V. Kerry Smith is Emeritus Regents’ Professor and Emeritus University Professor of Economics at Arizona State University. He is also an emeritus affiliated faculty member with the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning. Kerry’s general research interests include environmental economics, public economics, and applied econometrics. More specific topics include: economic valuation of environmental amenities and ecosystem services, sorting models and general equilibrium policy analysis, and the modeling of how uncertainty influences individuals’ behavior. He came to ASU from North Carolina State where he was the University Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for Environmental and Resource Economic Policy.

Prior to North Carolina State, he held positions as the Arts and Sciences Professor of Environmental Economics at Duke University and the Centennial Professor of Economics at Vanderbilt University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a Fellow of both the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and the American Agricultural Economics Association, a Research Associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a University Fellow with Resources for the Future.